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Tech Support

22 Jul

I know the following video has been around the Internet for quite awhile, but it has a great message for those of us in technology support positions!  The beginning of the school year can be a stressful time.  We have new devices to roll out, databases to maintain, accounts galore to setup, and training, training, and more training.  Remember the principles listed below to help you and your tech team have a successful start to the school year!

  1. Help them conquer their fears!  Many of our clients (teachers, employees,etc.) are fearful of technology.  I believe this mainly stems from a fear of the unknown.
  2. Clients need to be trained so they feel comfortable with the device they are using.  As a support professional provide training while you are troubleshooting an issue.  This will help solve future problems, and provide the client with confidence to begin troubleshooting problems on their own.
  3. Always have patience!  We were all noobs with technology at one point in time, and we all have our strengths and weaknesses.  Provide a safe environment that no question is off limits.  Build the client up rather than tearing them down.
  4. Have a light heart & smile!  No matter what you encounter in your work day there is always some other person having a worse day than you.  Be thankful for the employment and do your job to the best of your ability!
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5 Comments

Posted by on July 22, 2011 in EdTech, Education, Tech Support, YouTube

 

Tags: , , , ,

5 responses to “Tech Support

  1. olprojectengage

    July 22, 2011 at 10:05 pm

    I use this video in the online/LMS portion of our College 101: Succeeding in College. The students love it. We then discuss how technology is always changing. I co-teach with a humanities instructor and she actually talks about the difference between the scroll and the book. We then show the students Karl Fisch’s Shift Happens video and do a bit pitch for life-long learning, distributed learning and connectivism.

     
  2. butseriously

    July 23, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    I love this video! I haven’t seen it before, but it really hits the nail right on the head! I have been very successful helping teachers with technology because I use the principles that you talk about. Patience is key! I have also discovered that making a trade with services is helpful when helping teachers with tech. For example, I have helped the art teacher with different tech devices in his classroom and he helps me frame my pictures when I need it. He felt bad because he had to ask me for so much tech help, but I told him that I was horrible at art so now we just help each other and everything is cool!

     
    • lmeinert

      July 23, 2011 at 7:27 pm

      Glad I posted the video! I figured most everyone in the course and other readers would have seen it already. I like watching it every once and awhile because oh what we take for granted in the tech community. We expect using technology to be easy for everyone, and it reminds me of the systematic process that needs to happen when implementing new tools.

       
  3. cadeleo

    July 25, 2011 at 3:19 am

    Luke, great illustration of those of us who are technically challenged. It’s hard enough trying to keep up with technology that is rapidly evolving, but trying to remember how to get there, search for the answers to utilize that technology tools, and invest the time in learning the technology in order for it to do what you need it to do. I’ve learned to adapt, by using the internet to teach me how to videos, such as Lynda.com, YouTube, and BestTechVideos.com. Without those visual tutorials, I believe I would’ve been still stuck in the 20th century. Great samples.

     
    • lmeinert

      July 26, 2011 at 1:21 am

      It is very challenging to keep up with the latest and greatest tech tools. The thing to remember is that you don’t need to be an expert on the tool in order to use it in your classroom. Especially when using inquire based lessons. I hadn’t heard of BestTechVideos before I will have to check that out. Thanks for the suggestion!

       

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